Fletching Glasshouses

One of the delights of social media is that it’s quite easy to incorporate information from one place into another. Our vegetable production arm has its own web site which is all about Organic Vegetables in East Sussex. It has its own blog that updates the details of what’s available when with information about what else is going on at the nursery. So thanks to the wonders of the internet you don’t have to go looking for it – you can find it here.

Why we started the Intelligent Garden

I first started gardening as a research student working on how plants grow. Then we bought a small holding in Shropshire for a while before we discovered computers and marketing. 20 years later we started selling plants on-line.

Expansion meant we needed premises - so we acquired a nursery with 2 acres of glasshouse and started growing organic vegetables again. By September 2008 we had our soil association certification and had started selling biological controls online.

Talking to people on farmer's markets I sense a real hunger for people to garden and produce their own food. And a real interest in local and pesticide free produce.

So we created the Intelligent Garden ito help you get the most from your garden by offering the knowledge, products and advice you need to work effectively with nature to release the intelligence in your garden.

Company Registration 5003969
Vat Registration: 826 8892 74
Reg Office The Glasshouses, Fletching Common, BN84JJ

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SB Plant Invigorator

SB Plant Invigorator

We use SBI to control and reduce aphids, blackfly, red spider mite, scale insects and mealybug at our nursery at Fletching Glasshouses. We use it almost every other week and wet the plant thoroughly including the undersides of leaves where the aphids and crawlers like to lurk. […]

Three powerful reasons to grow organic.

The more organic matter in the soil the better it retains moisture. Each 1% of organic matter in the soil will retain 168,000 litres per hectare. That’s of course hard to visualise. What it means is 4 cubic meters for a standard 10 pole allotment or 14 kilos per square meter. So 5% organic matter in the soil will hold 70 kilos of water per square meter. Substantially more than the body weight of a model like Kate Moss. […]

The Woodland Garden starts to get established.


Update on the Intelligent Garden Woodland Garden project 3 months in – what’s doing well and how exciting that the sheet mulch / potato combination has worked so well […]

Visit to the Alara forest Garden in King’s Cross

Alar a Garden

Alex has created a garden about 50 metres long and about 8-10 meters wide along the West side of a factory unit. It has created a great microclimate on 2 terraces and after 5 years it’s already quiet prolific with an effective forest garden / permaculture mix of fruit trees, bushes, eleagnus to fix nitrogen and also to provide fruits, asparagus and some prominent cordons of japanese wineberry […]

How to create a hedge

As part of the Woodland Garden project we have been constructing a hedge on the outside to discourage deer by being prickly, pungent (the rosemary) while being as ornamental and edible as possible so that it would form an integral edge into our 5 metre woodland garden ribbon. […]

How to do Sheet Mulching

Sheet Mulching is a technique useful in converting grass or flower beds into productive ground. We are using it as a technique for building our forest garden by using it as part of the sequence towards perennial planting. Basically you cover the ground with something organic and rottable that the weeds can’t get through. Old Carpets and rugs made from natural fibres like cotton and wool are good as is cardboard. […]

Planting the Woodland Garden – 1 getting the trees in place

One of the principles of permaculture is stacking – three dimensional planting. So this means that are going to use fruit trees as the basis of our design., In between the trees, we plan to plant fruit bushes in between the fruit trees – ultimately they want to be sited at the drip line of the fruit tree canopy and below that we will plant a range of perennial vegetable and mulch crops – chard, comfrey, sweet potatoes etc. […]

Planning the Forest Garden – part 1

So I’ve decided to go in a snake about 4 -5 meters wide which will start from the fence at the bottom of the lower pool, come up to the Mulberry and sweep round through the plum to go back to the boundary just up from the slope to the exising birch and then go up the boundary and round, inside the fallen willow to the shed. I’ll put a half standard Blenheim Orange tree there so that there will be three large trees in that area with lower bush trees between there and the other birch to allow evening Sun in to reach the house. […]

Why plants need cold.

A quick overview of why plants can benefit from a cold snap. It’s kind of like a board game where the aim is to accumulate degree days. So one degree day is one day spent below a given temperature which varies from plant to plant. 1 day at 6 degrees below is worth 3 days at 2 degrees below. When the critical number is reached then the plants will move onto the next phase in the cycle. This tends to be a feature of long day plants. […]

Planning a Forest Garden – the intent

View across the site showing mulberry tree

We’ve decided build a forest garden area between our house and the open field. Putting in the rainwater reservoirs f involved removing a row of Apple Trees. So the plan is to replace these and try and build a stacked tract of ground that has fruit trees embedded in fruit bushes with a ground cover of comfrey, sweet potatoes, legumes and some leaf vegetables. […]